Slim and Franke

Slim and Franke
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Saturday, June 13, 2020

THEN AND NOW

How does the United States justify censorship and historical site destruction when we condemned other countries for the same things?

11 comments:

  1. It is a very tricky question. The statues in question are undeniably part of your history.
    However I can also understand the concern of African Americans. Perhaps they see the statues as a celebration of a very dark part of their histories, and as a celebration of men who fought to keep them enslaved.
    Hitler was part of Germany's history but I would be very surprised to learn that statues of him can still be seen in streets and boulevards.
    Perhaps the statues which cause offence could be housed in a museum? Keeping them 'front and centre' seems to be celebrating them...
    Sorry, I don't think this is expressed very well.

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  2. I agree with EC about keeping them in a museum, with notes about who they are and what they did, so the history is not forgotten, but also not celebrated. So that the past will not be repeated.

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  3. I think EC has expressed it well. I find little to honor about the confederacy. But I also think the victors did an abysmal job of reintegrating the South after the war. Carpetbaggers, corruption, etc. That didn't help.

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  4. I like the idea of them being in a museum too, that way seeing them is a choice but destroying them is unacceptable.

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  5. I agree with the museum idea. Then seeing them is history and optional.

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  6. Defintely in a museum. We shouldn't destroy them because that's almost denying what they did. Museums can help teach everyone about slavery and what it involved.
    Belsen & Auschwitz became museums to let the world see & remember what happened.
    Slavery is still happening in many parts of the world where people are trafficked, it hasn't gone away.

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  7. Yes, in a museum. The statues themselves are not history--they're memorials to the men who led the rebellion. I can't think of any other country that would allow statues of defeated generals to be on public display. The statues are art, and should not be defaced or destroyed, although I understand the anger and frustration driving this. But in a museum with the whole story is the best idea.

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  8. I agree with everyone else. The museum is a perfect place to put them with an explanation of their history, because it is our history.

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